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Chantler Lab

Paul D. Chantler, Principal Investigator

Project Name: Restoration of Cerebral Function in Metabolic Syndrome Post Ischemic Stroke

Description: Stroke kills almost 130,000 Americans each year—that's 1 out of every 20 deaths. On average, one American dies from stroke every 4 minutes. Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. Individuals with the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) have an increased risk of having a stroke and their response to a stroke is more severe. The cerebral vasculature plays a key role in stroke outcome and recovery. We known that in an animal model of MetS (Obese Zucker Rat) that the cerebral adaptions to MetS is significant and likely contributes to this increased stroke risk and stroke severity. The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which pre-existing MetS impacts stroke outcome and approaches to reduce the risk of stroke and improve stroke outcome.

Statement of Importance: The studies conducted herewill advance our understanding of the cardiovascular responses to stroke and provide the basis for improved clinical management of stroke.

Students: Kayla Branyan, MS, Evan DeVallance, MS, Kent Lemaster, MS, Roy Skinner, BS

Post Doc: Shin Asano

Collaborators: Jefferson Frisbee, James Simpkins, Sophie Ren

 

Project Name: CARE (Cardiac and Arterial Responses to Exercise) Study in the Metabolic Syndrome

Description: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is present in 56 million U.S. adults and is associated with a 3-fold greater risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality compared to healthy controls. In part, this increased CV risk can be attributed to pathophysiological changes to the vascular system including arterial stiffness (AS), endothelial dysfunction, and arterial remodeling, which are hallmarks of MetS. Increased AS also accentuates the CV burden and promotes an increase in blood pressures, cardiac hypertrophy, and impaired coronary perfusion. It is important to identify effective interventions to reduce CV risk in MetS.

Our objectives here are to examine how various exercise training programs from aerobic (land and aquatic based), high intensity and resistance exercise in the Metabolic syndrome can reverse or ameliorate the CV dysfunction noted in MetS. Further, we are interesting in determining the mechanisms by which exercise can exert its protective effects in the at risk population.

Statement of Importance: This work has significant public health relevance and could be used to update guidelines for physical activityin the primary and secondary prevention of CV disease in MetS patients.

Students: Sara Fournier, PhD, Evan DeVallance, MS, Kent Lemaster, MS, Corey Moore, BS, Heather Banister, BS

 

Project Name: Flavonoids and Metabolic Syndrome can they help?

Description: The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is present in 56 million U.S. adults and is associated with a 3-fold greater risk of cardiovascular (CV) mortality compared to healthy controls. In part, this increased CV risk can be attributed to pathophysiological changes to the vascular system including arterial stiffness (AS), endothelial dysfunction, and arterial remodeling, which are hallmarks of MetS.

Resveratrol (RSV) has been shown to reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. This is important given that MetS have chronically elevated inflammation and oxidative stress, which act to decrease nitric oxide bioavailability, alter matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their tissue inhibitors (key regulators of CV remodeling) that impair arterial function. Another interesting supplementation is Beetroot juice, which provides a natural means of increasing in vivo nitric oxide (NO) availability and has emerged as a potential strategy to prevent and manage pathologies associated with diminished NO bioavailability, notably MetS.

Thus, RSV or Beetroot juice supplementation could be a therapeutic tool to improve AS and CV function in MetS and we are currently will be tested in this current project.

Statement of Importance: Through this workwe expect to improve CV outcomes for MetS using an accessible, easy-to-integrate therapeutic strategy in combination with the current standard of care for MetS and begin to understand the mechanism(s) by which this therapeutic strategy works.

Students: Sara Fournier, PhD, Evan DeVallance, MS, Kent Lemaster, MS, Corey Moore, BS, Heather Banister, BS

Collaborators: Stephen Alway

 

Project Name: rHeART

Description: Despite a reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality over the past 30 years, substantial geographic health disparities remain. Rural areas have a 2-fold greater risk of CVD mortality and the rate of decline in CVD mortality is substantially less than other geographical areas. Effective strategies for addressing multiple CVD risk behaviors are clearly needed in rural communities. Although, lifestyle interventions performed in academic and clinical centers improve CVD outcomes, the CVD disparities, based on rurality, continue to widen due to a lack of “real world” application, relevance, and generalizability to rural areas.  Our objectives are to determine the feasibility and acceptability of the adapted lifestyle intervention to a rural community, and to determine the effectiveness of the lifestyle intervention on improving CVD risk

Statement of Importance: Considering the rising healthcare costs, projected to be $818 billion by 2030, and their impact on the economy, a reduction in the healthcare costs for the 60 million people living in rural areas, would lessen the burden on Medicare/Medicaid.

Students: Evan DeVallance, MS, Kent Lemaster, MS, Corey Moore, BS, Heather Banister, BS

Collaborators:, Mid Ohio Valley Health Department, Roane County Family Health Care, WV School of Osteopathic medicine