Nearly everyone knows someone who has been touched by cancer. More than 11,000 West Virginians were diagnosed with cancer in 2016 alone. What causes cancer? How can it be treated? Can it be prevented? Find out on the next “Doctors on Call” at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Feb.2, on West Virginia Public Television.

During live interviews, Tanya Fancy, MD, a head and neck surgeon with the WVU Cancer Institute, will discuss head and neck cancer, and Min Deng, MD, WVU Medicine dermatologist, will explain the benefits of Mohs surgery for skin cancer. WVU Cancer Institute surgeon Jon Cardinal, MD, will also appear live.

February is National Children's Dental Health Month, and Michael Bagby, DDS, WVU Dentistry pediatric dental specialist, will discuss the importance of making sure your kids get regular dental care.

Don’t miss the story of Luke Mertz, who suffered a traumatic brain injury during a dirt bike accident and had to relearn to walk, eat, and speak.

“DOC Talk,” the call-in portion of the show, will provide viewers with the opportunity to ask questions of two WVU Cancer Institute experts – Kelly Ross, MD, and Alan Thomay, MD.

The “DOC List” will report the top 10 cancers impacting West Virginians. Spoiler: colorectal cancer is number four, so screening is important! If a colonoscopy is too scary, the “DOC Demo” will show you how to use a colon cancer test kit at home. On “It’s No Big Deal,” show your kids how easy it is to go to the dentist. “DOC in the Kitchen” will show you how to use a slow cooker to make healthy meals that can be portioned for quick, healthy meals later.

WVU Medicine physicians John Phillips, MD, and Mahreen Hashmi, MD, will host the show. Highlights will be tweeted live on Thursday evening (@DOCWVU). Viewers can also get updates, suggest topics, and provide feedback anytime on Facebook (facebook.com/DoctorsOnCallWVU).

Now in its 25th season, “Doctors On Call” transitioned from a weekly, half-hour-long, live call-in show to an hour-long magazine style show in 2014. The show airs quarterly.