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  • David Scadden to deliver the 2015 DeLynn Lecture; All are welcome

    Wednesday, September 2, 2015

    David Scadden, M.D., will deliver the 2015 Laurence and Jean DeLynn Lecture at 4 p.m., Thursday, September 10, in Fukushima Auditorium.

  • WVU Health Sciences Center Bridge Funding Grants revised Aug. 12

    Friday, August 14, 2015

    The WVU Health Sciences Center Office of Research and Graduate Education announces the availability of Bridge Funding Grants (BFGs) to provide interim research support for investigators whose extramural funding is ending.

  • WVU RESEARCH SHOWS PROMISE FOR REDUCING RISK OF BREAST CANCER SPREADING TO THE BRAIN

    Thursday, January 15, 2015

    MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Generally speaking, women diagnosed with breast cancer are surviving longer and having better outcomes. While one in eight women will develop breast cancer during their lifetime, the vast majority will beat the disease. However, 10 to 15 percent of those diagnosed may see their cancer spread to another part of their body.  

  • SCHOOL OF MEDICINE RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY SCHIZOPHRENIA GENES

    Tuesday, December 2, 2014

    MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – On June 26, 2000, former President Bill Clinton announced the completion of the world’s first survey of the entire human genome, the Human Genome Project. In his words, “Without a doubt, this is the most important, most wondrous map ever produced by humankind.”

  • OPPORTUNITY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH AT WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

    Friday, November 21, 2014

    On behalf of the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (Statler) and the School of Medicine (SoM), we are pleased to announce an exciting opportunity to stimulate externally funded collaborative biomedical engineering research. This opportunity is made possible through the support of the Byars-Tarnay Endowment in the WVU Foundation. The endowment was established to build biomedical engineering programs for the Statler College with the SoM.

  • NEUROSCIENCE GRADUATE STUDENT AWARDED A RUTH L. KIRSCHSTEIN NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARD

    Thursday, October 9, 2014

    Paul S. Holcomb, a Biomedical Sciences Graduate student studying Neuroscience, was recently awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), National Institutes of Health. This highly selective and very prestigious fellowship will allow Paul to complete a research project entitled, “Structural Polarity Influences Terminal Placement and Competition in Formation of the Calyx of Held.”   The goal of Paul’s NIH predoctoral fellowship is to determine the role of the polarity of neurons in the formation and competition of terminals during the development of the central nervous system. For this project, Paul will be using the development of the auditory brainstem – specifically the calyx of Held, one of the largest terminals in the mammalian nervous system – as a model system for his research. Clinically, the development of this area has significant impact, both in deafness and due to a high prevalence of disorders of this neural circuit in autism spectrum disorders.    Paul’s research interests focus on how the brain is structured, both at a cellular level and whole circuit level. His other research interests include development of the auditory system, synaptogenesis, glial biology, brain-machine interfacing, neural plasticity, and computational neuroscience. In the future, he would like to study how the connectivity of the brain structures – termed “connectomics” - influences device design for brain-machine interfaces. The field of connectomics, which is a new field in neuroscience, allows researchers to map connections in the brain in order to create visual diagrams of how these connections, or connectomes, are wired and organized. By comparing connectomes in both healthy and diseased brains, scientists hope to gain insight on the anatomical and functional connectivity within the brain that will eventually facilitate research of brain disorders.    Paul earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Biomedical Engineering from Vanderbilt University in 2005. He worked in industry with Breault Research Organization in Tucson, AZ, for four years before moving to Morgantown with his wife, Micky. Paul is currently enrolled at WVU as a biomedical sciences graduate student focusing on neuroscience. He also has a certificate in teaching at the university level from WVU, focusing on teaching STEM disciplines. Paul was a distinguished speaker during the 2014 WVU Festival of Ideas, during which he presented, “The BRAIN Initiative: Computers, Connectomes, and the Emergence of Technobiology.” He was also the winner of the 2013 West Virginia Science Idol competition.    Paul will complete his NRSA project while working in the WVU Center for Neuroscience, which is directed by his mentor, Dr. George Spirou, Professor of Otolaryngology and Physiology & Pharmacology. For more information about the Center for Neuroscience, visit http://www.hsc.wvu.edu/wvucn/.

  • AUTISM BRAIN-STUDY UNDERWAY AT WVU

    Thursday, October 9, 2014

    By GLYNIS BOARD The Center for Disease Control reports that one in 68 children in the U.S. will have autism. That number jumps to 1 in 42 if we’re just talking about boys. And the risk increases if you already a have a child with autism. In West Virginia, new research is underway to try to get at how the autistic mind ticks. Paula Webster is a neuroscience graduate who works in the Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the Center for Neuroscience at West Virginia University.

  • THE MARY BABB RANDOLPH CANCER CENTER (MBRCC) AND OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND GRADUATE EDUCATION ANNOUNCE THE AVAILABILITY OF TWO PILOT AWARD FUNDING MECHANISMS.

    Friday, May 30, 2014

    The Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center (MBRCC) and Office of Research and Graduate Education announce the availability of two pilot award funding mechanisms. The American Cancer Society (ACS) (http://www.cancer.org), supported Pilot Project Grants (PPG) and the “Let the Journey Begin” CNS Malignancy focused PPG with applications due Monday, June 30, 2014, 2014.  Applicants may include faculty from the Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Pharmacy and Public Health or other WVU Schools and Colleges.

  • THE OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND GRADUATE EDUCATION ANNOUNCES THE OPPORTUNITY FOR SUBMISSIONS OF COBRE PRE-PROPOSALS

    Tuesday, May 6, 2014

    The WVU HSC will submit a single application to NIH for a new Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (CoBRE) for the January 28, 2015 deadline (http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-11-286.html).    Currently, there are two Phase 3 CoBRE grants at WVU:  “Transitional Center in Neuroscience” (PI:  George Spirou); and “Signal Transduction and Cancer” (PI:  Laura Gibson).  An A1 application for “Sroke” (PI:  Jim Simpkins) has been submitted and is under review.    The Office of Research and Graduate Education is soliciting pre-proposals from groups interested in submitting a full application for the 2015 deadline.  Pre-proposals are limited to three pages, and should include the proposed director, general theme of the CoBRE and its cores and projects, names/departments of potential mentored scientists, names/departments of faculty who could serve as mentors, and investments or improvements that would be needed to ensure a competitive application.  Include NIH biosketches for all faculty who will be involved.                                                                                  Proposals should be submitted by email by June 15, 2014 to Melissa McDilda (mmcdilda@hsc.wvu.edu, 304-293-6232).  Following review, one proposal will be selected for development of a full application.  Questions can be addressed to Jamal Mustafa, sjmustafa@hsc.wvu.edu, 304-293-5116.

  • FORMER BBS TRAINEE AWARDED A RUTH L. KIRCHSTEIN NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARD

    Saturday, April 5, 2014

    Cameron L. Randall, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology, Eberly College of Arts and Sciences, recently was awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) from the National Institute for Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health. The competitive individual pre-doctoral fellowship will allow Cameron to complete a large research project, Dental Pain Sensitivity, Fear, and Avoidance: Linkages with the MC1R Gene, an extension of his dissertation work.  The study is aimed at exploring the role of genetic factors in the experience of dental pain and seeks to determine the mechanisms by which genes and environment interact to produce fear of pain, dental care-related fear, and dental treatment avoidance in humans. Additionally, the fellowship will provide Cameron with advanced and specialized training opportunities across several domains of the behavioral sciences and in statistical genetics. Cameron is the first Eberly College of Arts and Sciences student to receive this type of award from the National Institutes of Health. His research, which bridges psychological science, behavior genetics, dentistry, and public health, is intended to improve our understanding of psychosocial barriers to health care in order to better the delivery of care and to reduce health disparities. Cameron’s specific research interests include: (1) the psychological processes involved in pain perception, treatment-seeking behavior, and health outcomes; (2) the etiology and treatment of healthcare-related fear and anxiety; and (3) the dissemination of knowledge on these topics to healthcare professionals. Cameron completed his undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where his majors were biology and psychology. After working as a research assistant at the Center for Developmental Science in Chapel Hill, NC, he began studying clinical psychology at West Virginia University, earning a master’s degree in 2012. At WVU, he has been supported by the NIH-funded Research Training Program in the Behavioral and Biomedical Sciences (BBS). Cameron will complete the NRSA project in collaboration with the Anxiety, Psychophysiology, and Pain Research Laboratory, which is directed by his mentor, Daniel W. McNeil, Ph.D. Dr. McNeil and Mary L. Marazita, Ph.D., at the University of Pittsburgh, will serve on the project as the sponsor and co-sponsor, respectively. For more information about the Anxiety, Psychophysiology, and Pain Research Laboratory, visit www.daniel_mcneil.psychology.wvu.edu. For more information about Cameron and his research, visit www.cameronlrandall.com.