A photo of Candice Brown.
Candice M. Brown, PhD
West Virginia University
Positions
Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience
Assistant Professor, Microbiology, Immunology & Cell Biology
Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine
Assistant Professor, Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute (SOM)
Phone
304-293-0589

Candice M. Brown, PhD is an Assistant Professor who earned her Ph.D. from Duke University, completed a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Phyllis M. Wise at the University of Washington, and was an Assistant Professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine prior to joining the WVU faculty as a member of the Department of Neuroscience. She is a recent past K01 awardee who received a WVU Stroke CoBRE pilot grant ($50,000) in 2016. The objective of her proposal is to elucidate a novel physiological role for tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), a ubiquitous enzyme most commonly known for its role in bone and mineral metabolism, in the blood-brain barrier during ischemic stroke. Recent studies have also focused on intestinal alkaline phosphatases and their role in the regulation of the gut-brain-microbiota axis in ischemic stroke. For more information, please see the Brown lab website: https://cmbrownlab.com and please follow us Twitter: @BrownLabWVU.

A photo of Werner Geldenhuys.
Werner Geldenhuys, PhD, MS
West Virginia University
Positions
Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences
Associate Professor, Department of Neuroscience
Phone
304-581-1683

Werner Geldenhuys, PhD is an Associate Professor who earned his Ph.D. from North-West University in South Africa, completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Texas Tech School of Pharmacy, and then accepted his first faculty position at the College of Pharmacy at Northeast Ohio Medical University. His research project is based upon a newly discovered outer mitochondrial membrane protein called mitoNEET (CISD1) which regulates bioenergetic capacity of the mitochondria. His proposal is focused on strategies to minimize reperfusion injury from stroke, during which many agents that are toxic to neurons and glia are produced. During his current tenure in the WVU Stroke CoBRE, Dr. Geldenhuys received a SBIR grant to support his drug discovery research for stroke protection ($258,700).

A photo of Edwin Wan.
Edwin Wan
West Virginia University
Positions
Assistant Professor, Microbiology, Immunology & Cell Biology
Assistant Professor, Department of Neuroscience
Phone
304-293-6293

Edwin Chi Keung Wan, PhD is an Assistant Professor who completed his PhD at the City University of Hong Kong, completed postdoctoral fellowships at the Duke University and then the NHLBI, and joined the WVU faculty in 2016. Dr. Wan’s proposal highlights post-stroke pneumonia as the primary etiology of post-stroke mortality. The premise for the project includes increased prevalence of pulmonary and urinary tract infection post-stroke, which leads to the central hypothesis that pneumonia is due to a tissue-specific decrease in immune function. The aims address the central hypothesis and the basis for the mechanistic hypotheses by characterizing the immune cell niche in lung tissue. 

A photo of Zachary Weil.
Zachary Weil, PhD
West Virginia University
Position
Associate Professor, Department of Neuroscience
Phone
304-293-7674

Zachary Weil, PhD is an Associate Professor who received his PhD at Ohio State University completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Rockefeller University with Drs. Bruce McEwen and Donald Pfaff. He returned to Ohio State as a faculty member in 2010 and joined the faculty in the WVU School of Medicine in 2019. His research has been previously funded by the American Heart Association and he is currently funded by a NIH R21 (Neuroendocrine determinants of sex differences in post-traumatic drinking). His research project is designed to investigate the increased incidence and severity of strokes in individuals with a history of traumatic brain injuries. The central hypothesis of this project is that neurometabolic dysfunction following TBI renders the brain disproportionately vulnerable to ischemic damage.

Research Forrest